Carol R. Eaton Designs

Carol R. Eaton Designs

Saturday, July 13, 2013

Creating Textures with Fabric Paint

Do you ever have an idea that gets lodged in your brain and keeps twirling around and coming back in different forms? This keeps happening to me with the idea on how to create texture on fabric. I seriously lay in bed in the wee hours of the morning thinking about various ways I can make this happen. I jump out of bed at 5 am and head to the studio to see if I can translate my idea into reality!

As I mentioned in previous posts I'm reconnecting with my fabric paints and having a great time. I'd forgotten how instantly paints give you results... you're able to watch the colors migrate forming really fun and unexpected results.

In this post I'll share results from last weeks play time...

Elevating the Fabric


Folded Fabric

Elevating the Fabric


Elevating the Fabric
Canvas Fabric

Ice Cube Manipulation

Elevating the Fabric

10 comments:

  1. Oh pretty! I love the results in photos 4 and 5!

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    1. Thanks! I elevated the fabric... think I'm onto a new technique!

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  2. I love the results, but not sure I understand how you elevate the fabric... are you propping something up underneath it? I have come up with somewhat similar results with dyes and pvc connectors, but I'm sure that's not what you did here. Beautiful results!

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  3. Hi Judy! Sorry to have been so vague - I was in a hurry and should have waited until I had more time to be articulate! "Prop" - that was the word I was searching for! I propped the fabric up with varies bottles, jars and lids. I painted directly onto the surface and let the paint meander where it pleased. I tried to make sure the whole surface was covered but the artist canvas I have is sometimes difficult to saturate despite washing off the finish. The end result is dependent on the type of object you place under it. The only trick I see so far is to paint directly onto the lumpy surface vs. painting a flat surface and then propping it up. Can you share some photos of your results?!

    Cheers!

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  4. Carol you're a genius! Are these done with a Dyna-Flo type paint that behaves more like a dye, or did you dilute a thicker fabric paint?

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    1. I think of it more as an accidental delight! I use Pueblo Seta Color paints that I mail order from Dharma Trading. I've seen them in quilt shops but only in small expensive sets. If you find them online they will be larger and more reasonably priced. I dilute the paints before I use them and the amount depends on what affect I'm looking for. The fabric is typically misted or dampened before you paint so that too creates some diluting. Have fun and share your pics with me!

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  5. I did an accidental "propping" once & it turned out looking like a sunset. I then appliqued a Japanese Gate (each city in Japan has one at their entrance to their city)in black as a silhouette. I was looking for somewhere to lay this piece of fabric (that was left over from another jobby) & found an old standard lamp shade from that I was going to cover one day, but for now it was somewhere to sit the fabric. Not knowing what I was really doing at the time, I returned the following day to find this sunset fabric. It now proudly hangs at my daughter's place, to remind her of being in Japan & going back one day.
    Regina

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    1. What a great story! Art is full of unanticipated delights!

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    2. Thank you, I am going to get my daughter to take a picture & send it to me so I can put it up on my blog. I also have the "Howling Wolf" one I must put up too.. sorry, that's a quilt I did in just over a week.... coloured the fabric, appliqued, embroidered (old machine way) & finished for my eldests birthday.

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  6. Jenn Anderson
    Boston, MA
    I am having l nightmares over the Rhino Shield covering on my house, installed just over three years ago. Large bubbles are in the material that I can slit and hand peel the material, right down to the bare red cedar clapboards, which were also primed with an oil primer and finished with latex paint before the Rhino-Shield was applied. The material has a lifetime guarantee, so when I called several persons, including the owner Rhino Shield they all came over quickly.
    Rhino Shield said that the material was probably put on when the cedar was damp, and thus would strip everything and apply a new primer and finish coat, let dry, then apply new Rhino Shield, adding that there will be no more work till flashing is....
    Read more about my issue here
    http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2013/09/14/coating-home-bubbled-after-years/EvVT7CXrTWHf9A6Ky9eF9N/story.html

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